Hey there. Yes you. So, you want to become a modern webapp developer? Interested perhaps in fluid and responsive websites? Client-side and back-end MVC? Javascript-based full-featured sites? Kudos to you for taking some initiative. Mind you, there is a lot to learn. This post will only scratch the surface, as I brush on choosing a language, framework, datastore, and even a brief explanation of deployment practices. I throw around names of some useful tools, and even suggest some Javascript libraries/MVC libraries to use. I go over the full stack, from database to application layer from both the front and the back end. Even throw some server and hosting info in there. You know what? I’m feeling generous, I’ll even touch on using frameworks to write APIs.

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Constructivist theory aims to facilitate education in creating environments and teaching methods that produce individuals whom have developed analytical skills, thereby enabling them to pinpoint and define problems as well as their own choices. Challenges include surmounting the cultural trend towards the commodification of higher education, which has resulted in an undermining of professional preparedness. Constructivism theorists attempt to remedy this issue by re-framing the constructivist approach in order to promote authentic student-centeredness.

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This is the second post in a series entitled “Why the Internet of Things Will Make Everyone a Programmer”. In case you haven’t gotten a chance to read my first post, which outlines some of the theoretical concepts behind an IoT, I highly recommend reviewing it before reading ahead. This post will go over the rapid developments in microchip technology, and their impact on the miniaturization of electronics as well as the associated impact on production costs.

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This is the first post in a series I entitle “Why The Internet of Things Will Make Everyone a Programmer”. This is a claim that will not be addressed until the third or fourth entry, as first I would like to give a background on both the theory and development of such an infrastructure.

There’s been a lot of talk recently on The Internet of Things (IoT), but in case you haven’t heard about it, here’s a good excerpt from Kevin Ashton, who initially proposed the concept:

“Today computers—and, therefore, the Internet—are almost wholly dependent on human beings for information…conventional diagrams of the Internet … leave out the most numerous and important routers of all - people…we’re physical, and so is our environment…ideas and information are important, but things matter much more. Yet today’s information technology is so dependent on data originated by people that our computers know more about ideas than things. If we had computers that knew everything there was to know about things—using data they gathered without any help from us—we would be able to track and count everything…[we would] know when things needed replacing, repairing or recalling, and whether they were fresh or past their best.”

The core concept behind this idea goes further back than Ashton’s own explanation, to a theoretical device developed in 1945 by Vannevar Bush called the memex, a compound of the words “memory” and “extender”.

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As I sit here sipping on some lukewarm tea I can’t help but narrate this passage in a slow moving, energetic Morgan Freeman voice. Welcome readers, to my blog.

My name is Michal Krupa. I’m a current CS student at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. I was raised in Silicon Valley, and am originally from Poland. I have been an active developer since middle school. I love all things computers—although I develop web applications, I love setting up office and cloud infrastructures as well as learning about new cloud technologies.

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